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BRACHYCERATOPS

a herbivorous centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of North America.
brachyceratops.png
Pronunciation: BRAK-i-SEH-ruh-tops
Meaning: Short horn face
Author/s: Gilmore (1914)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Montana, USA
Chart Position: 80

Brachyceratops montanensis

Discovered on a Blackfoot reservation in Teton County, Brachyceratops was named on the strength of a jumble of bones pertaining to five juveniles—possibly nest-fellows that had stayed together after hatching—which has made research a tad problematic.

Ceratopsian features change dramatically with age, especially in the shape, size and angle of their horns and frills, so although paleontologists suspect Brachyceratops represents an immature version of a critter that is already known from adult material, comparisons are impossible without a series of growth stage specimens showing how one gradually morphed into the other.

Gilmore referred a larger subadult specimen (USNM 14765) to Brachyceratops in 1939, but McDonald assigned it to the same area's uber-nose-horned Rubeosaurus—known as Styracosaurus ovatus until 2010—in 2011. Some experts think all of the infant specimens, and thus Brachyceratops in its entirety, may belong to Styracosaurus too, but if this is the case then their stumpy infant snout bumps and frill-border pimples had a heck of a lot of growing to do.

Etymology
Brachyceratops is derived from the Greek "brachys" (short), "ceras" (horn) and "ops" (face), alluding to its short snout. The species epithet, montanensis, means "from Montana" in Latin.
Discovery
The first remains of Brachyceratops were discovered in the Two Medicine Formation of Teton County, Montana, by C.W. Gilmore and his assistant J.F. Strayrer in 1913.
The holotype (USNM 7951, currently housed at the Smithsonian Institute of Washington D.C) is a partial, juvenile skull. A larger, subadult specimen (USNM 14765) discovered a mile away from the original site was referred here by Gilmore in 1939.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 81-74 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 2 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 80 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Gilmore CW (1914) "A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Montana, with note on Hypacrosaurus". Smithsonian miscellaneous collections, Vol. 62, No. 3, 21st March 1914.
• Gilmore CW (1917) "
Brachyceratops, a ceratopsian dinosaur from the Two Medicine Formation of Montana, with notes on associated fossil reptiles".
United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 103.
• Ryan MJ, Holmes R and Russell AP (2007) "A revision of the Late Campanian Centrosaurine Styracosaurus from the Western interior of North America".
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 27(4):944-962.
• Dodson P (1996) "The Horned Dinosaurs". Princeton University Press
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "BRACHYCERATOPS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 29th Mar 2017.
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