dinochecker
Welcome to our UGRUNAALUK entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 800
fbtwitg+feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

Saturday, 29th of April, 2017
The database has been scoured and today's daily dinosaur is...

UGRUNAALUK

a plant-eating saurolophine hadrosaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Alaska.
img
Pronunciation: oo-GREW-nah-luk
Meaning: Ancient grazer
Author/s: Mori, Druckenmiller & Erickson (2015)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alaska, USA
Chart Position: 733

Ugrunaaluk kuukpikensis

The remains that would become Ugrunaaluk were initially identified as the property of a crested lambeosaurine hadrosaurid by Brouwers et al. in 1987. Subsequent researchers reassigned them to Saurolophinae (the flat-headed hadrosaurids) and tentatively referred them to Edmontosaurus, more specifically to Edmontosaurus regalis. However, a comprehensive study of this material had not been conducted, mainly because the majority of it belongs to juvenile specimens and hadrosaurid species are differentiated by features that are only present in adults. Fortunately, Edmontosaurus is known from a broad range of growth stages, and Ugrunaaluk was proven to be distinct by sporting a suite of features lacking in all of them, even those of the same size.
(Ancient grazer from the Colville River)Etymology
Ugrunaaluk is named to honor a Native culture of Alaska, being derived from the Iñupiaq words "ugruŋnaq" (referring to a grazing animal with a long set of grinding teeth) and "-aluk" (old). The species epithet, kuukpikensis, is derived from "kuukpik" (the Iñupiaq word for the Colville River, Alaska, along which the type material was found) and the Latin "-ensis" (from).
Discovery
The remains of Ugrunaaluk were discovered in the Liscomb bonebed of the Prince Creek Formation (formerly referred to as the Kogosukuruk Tongue of the PCF; Gryc et al. 1951), along the Colville River, northern Alaska, USA. The holotype (UAMES 12995) is a right premaxilla (upper jawbone) plucked from thousands of bone fragments suggestive of a mass mortality event, perhaps flooding caused by a rapid snowmelt from the then-rising Brooks Range to the south.
Habitat
The Prince Creek Formation is composed of conglomerates, coal and mudstone layers, suggesting an area of flat, low-lying land adjacent to a seacoast, with meandering channels and floodplains, polar woodlands and angiosperms. Although considerably milder than today, paleobotanical evidence indicates a mean annual temperature of 5–6 °C for Late Cretaceous Alaska, which was too cold for cold-blooded critters like crocodiles. But dinosaurs thrived, judging by the thirteen species that have been found here (though, at the time of writing, only three have been officially named), and many were unique to this area, leading paleontologists to tag the Prince Creek Formation "Paaŋaqtat Province".
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Maastrichtian
Age range: 71-68 mya
Vital Stats:
Est. max. length: ?
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: ?
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Hirotsugu Mori, Patrick S. Druckenmiller, and Gregory M. Erickson (2015) "A new Arctic hadrosaurid from the Prince Creek Formation (lower Maastrichtian) of northern Alaska". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica.
• Mori, H. (2014) "Osteology, Relationships And Paleoecology Of a New Arctic Hadrosaurid (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) From the Prince Creek Formation Of Northern Alaska". Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks 333 pp.
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "UGRUNAALUK :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 29th Apr 2017.
  top