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ALIWALIA

a synonym of Eucmenesaurus fortis from the Late Triassic of South Africa.
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Pronunciation: ah-lih-WALL-ee-uh
Meaning: of the Aliwal Park reserve
Author/s: Galton (1985)
Synonyms: n/a
First Discovery: Cape Province, South Africa
Chart Position:

Aliwalia rex

Aliwalia caused much excitement within scientific circles, not because of a partial thighbone that represents the bulk of its remains, but because Harry Seeley linked its partial thighbone to a sharp-tooth-packed maxilla (upper jaw bone) which hinted at the presence of an enormous meat-eating 'saur in the Triassic of South Africa.

For many years, the sheer size of these remains led many experts to believe that Aliwalia was a remarkably large carnivore for the age in which it lived, and would have given the greatest Jurassic and Cretaceous theropods a run for their money... if not for the fact that they evolved dozens of millions of years later, of course.

To this day, the toothy jawbone's owner is still a complete mystery. But the femur, as proven by further discoveries from the same area, is the property of Eucnemesaurus fortis—a non-sauropod sauropodomorph (aka "prosauropod") similar to Riojasaurus—which is itself historically tangled with Euskelosaurus.
(Aliwal King)Etymology
Aliwalia is named for the Aliwal Park Reserve, in which it was discovered. The species epithet, rex, means "king" in Latin.
Discovery
Aliwalia rex was found in the lower Elliot Formation at Barnard's Spruit (also called Ezelsklip) in the Stornberg Mountains, about 15 miles south of Aliwal North, Albert (Burgersdorp) District, Cape Province, South Africa, by Alfred Brown—an amateur 19th-century fossil collector—in 1866. The holotype (NMW 1886-XV-39 and NMW-1876-VII-B124) is both ends of what appears to be the same femur (thighbone). The above-mentioned jawbone, catalogued as BMNH R3301, was described in 1894 and assigned to Euskelosaurus browni by Harry Govier Seeley, albeit with some reservations.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Triassic
Stage: Norian
Age range: 228-209 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 6 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 500 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Huxley T.H. (1867) "On some Remains of large Dinosaurian Reptiles from the Stormberg Mountains, South Africa". Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society 23: 1–6.
• Galton P.M. (1985) "The poposaurid thecodontian Teratosaurus suevicus v. meyer plus referred specimens mostly based on prosauropod dinosaurs from the middle stubensandstein Upper Triassic of Nordwuerttemberg, Eest Germany". Stuttgarter Beitraege zur Naturkunde Serie B (Geologie und Palaeontologie) (116): 1-29. [names Aliwalia rex]
• Yates A.M. (2006) "Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: the identity of Aliwalia rex Galton". Historical Biology, 19, 93–123.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "ALIWALIA :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 10th Dec 2017.
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