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DIPLODOCUS

a plant-eating diplodocine sauropod dinosaur from the late Jurassic of North America.
diplodocus.png
Pronunciation: di-PLOD-uh-kus
Meaning: Double Beam
Author/s: Marsh (1878)
Synonyms: Seismosaurus
First Discovery: Colorado, USA
Chart Position: 39

Diplodocus longus

This entry is being updated but should be back online before the next extinction.
Etymology
Diplodocus is derived from the Greek "diploos" (double) and "dokos" (beam), in reference to the double-beamed bones (chevrons) on the underside of its tail. This feature was once thought to be unique to Diplodocus but has since been discovered in other sauropods. The species epithet, longus, means "long, extended" in Latin.
Discovery
The remains of Diplodocus were discovered at Felch Quarry 1 in the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Fremont County, Colorado, by Benjamin Mudge and Samuel Wendell Williston in 1877.
The holotype (YPM 1920) is a partial, skulless skeleton.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Jurassic
Stage: Kimmeridgian
Age range: 156-151 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 25 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 21 tons
Diet: Herbivore
Other species
Diplodocus hallorum (NMMNH P-3690) is based on remains from what is now known as "Seismosaurus Quarry I" (NMMNH locality L-344 ) in the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Sandoval County, New Mexico, which was named Seismosaurus halli by Gillette in 1991. When this species was officially moved to Diplodocus in 2006 it took the largest touchable* diplodocid remains with it (*see Amphicoelias).
It may simply be a super-large specimen of Diplodocus longus.
Diplodocus hayi (HMS 175) is known from a partial skeleton discovered by William H. Utterback in at Red Fork Powder River Quarry A in the Morrison Formation, near Sheridan, Johnson County, Wyoming, in 1902.
Diplodocus carnegii (CM 84) was found at Carnegie Quarry D (Sheep Creek) in the Upper Morrison Formation of Cañon City, Colorado, by Jacob Wortman. This is the best known specimen of Diplodocus because, well, it's the best known specimen of Diplodocus, remains-wise.
Diplodocus lacustris (YPM 1922) is based on a lower jawbone found at Lakes Quarry 5 (aka Beckwith Quarry, Dinosaur Ridge) in the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Jefferson County, Colorado. It may simply be a juvenile version of Diplodocus longus rather than a standalone species.
References
• Marsh, O.C. (1884) "Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part VII. On the Diplodocidae, a new family of the Sauropoda. Part I". American Journal of Science 3: 411–416.
• J.B. Hatcher (1901) "Diplodocus Marsh, Its Osteology, Taxonomy, and Probable Habits, with a Restoration of the Skeleton".
• Upchurch P, Barrett PM, Dodson P (2004) "Sauropoda" in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmólska (eds.) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
• McIntosh, John S. (2005) "The Genus Barosaurus Marsh" in Carpenter and Tidswell (eds.) "Thunder Lizards: The Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs".
• Lucas S, Herne M, Heckert A, Hunt A, and Sullivan R. (2004) "Reappraisal of Seismosaurus, A Late Jurassic Sauropod Dinosaur from New Mexico".
• Whitlock, John A.; Wilson, Jeffrey A. & Lamanna, Matthew C. (March 2010) "Description of a Nearly Complete Juvenile Skull of Diplodocus (Sauropoda: Diplodocoidea) from the Late Jurassic of North America".
• Gillette D.G and Hallett M. (1999) "Seismosaurus: the earth shaker" / uk.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "DIPLODOCUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 21st Sep 2017.
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