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AEOLOSAURUS

a herbivorous titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Argentina.
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Pronunciation: EE-o-lo-SOR-us
Meaning: Aeolus lizard
Author/s: Powell (1987)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Rio Negro, Argentina
Chart Position: 266

Aeolosaurus rionegrinus

(Wind lizard from Rio Negro) Etymology
Aeolosaurus is derived from "Aeolus" (keeper of the Winds in Homer's Odyssey) and the Greek "sauros" (lizard), named for the frequent winds that blow across Patagonia.
The species epithet, rionegrinus, refers to its discovery in the Rio Negro Province.
Discovery
The first remains of Aeolosaurus were discovered in the Angostura Colorada Formation at Casa de Piedra, Estancia Maquinchao, Río Negro Province, Argentina.
The holotype (MJG-R 1) is a partial skeleton including seven tail vertebrae, both shoulder blades, both arms, right and left ischia, right lower leg, an ankle, five metacarpals, and some indeterminate fragments.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian-Maastrichtian
Age range: 73-067 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 15 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 14 tons
Diet: Herbivore
Other species
Aeolosaurus colhuehuapensis — Wind lizard from Lake Colhué Huapi — (Casal et al., 2007), is based on UNPSJB-PV 959/1-959/27; tail vertebrae and chevrons from the upper member of the Bajo Barreal Formation, Chubut Province, Argentina.
Aeolosaurus maximus — Large wind lizard — (Santucci & De Arruba-Campos, 2011), is based on MPMA 12-0001-97; a partial skeleton from the Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group), approximately 12 Km SW of the city of Monte Alto, São Paulo State, Brazil. It was found in 1997 and 1998 by the staff of the Museu de Paleontologia de Monte Alto.
References
• J. E. Powell (1987) "The Late Cretaceous fauna of Los Alamitos, Patagonia, Argentina part VI-the titanosaurids".
• Z. Gasparini, R.A. Coria, L. Salgado (2007) "Patagonian Mesozoic Reptiles". /uk.
• Fernando E. Novas (2009) "The Age of Dinosaurs in South America".
• Rodrigo M. Santucci and Antonio C. De Arruda-Campos (2011) "A new sauropod (Macronaria, Titanosauria) from the Adamantina Formation, Bauru Group, Upper Cretaceous of Brazil and the phylogenetic relationships of Aeolosaurini".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "AEOLOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 25th Jul 2017.
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