dinochecker
Welcome to our BAROSAURUS entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 843
fb twit g+ feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

BAROSAURUS

a herbivorous diplodocine sauropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of North America.
Pronunciation: BAR-o-SOR-us
Meaning: Heavy lizard
Author/s: Marsh (1890)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: South Dakota, USA
Chart Position: 51

Barosaurus lentus

Etymology
Barosaurus is derived from the Greek "barys" (heavy) and "sauros" (lizard) because of its large size. The species epithet, lentus, means "slow" in Latin.
Discovery
The first remains of Barosaurus were discovered in the Morrison Formation of South Dakota, USA, by Ms. E.R. Ellerman and were excavated by John Bell Hatcher of Yale University in 1889. The holotype (YPM 429) consists of six tail vertebrae, but further vertebrae, ribs and limb bones from the same specimen—left in the ground and under the watchful eye of the landowners—were removed by George Reber Wieland nine years later. The most complete specimen of Barosaurus was excavated from the Carnegie Quarry at Dinosaur National Monument in 1923 by Earl Douglass, but its remains were spread across the University of Utah, Washington's National Museum of Natural History, and the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh, until Barnum Brown had them all shipped to New York City's American Museum of Natural History in 1929.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Jurassic
Stage: Kimmeridgian-Tithonian
Age range: 156-145 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 26 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 20 tons
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Foster, John R. (1996) "Sauropod dinosaurs of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic), Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming".
McIntosh, John S. (2005) "The genus Barosaurus Marsh" in Carpenter and Tidswell (eds.) "Thunder Lizards: The Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs". /uk.
• Lovelace, David M., Hartman, Scott A. and Wahl, William R. (2007) "Morphology of a specimen of Supersaurus (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the Morrison Formation of Wyoming, and a re-evaluation of diplodocid phylogeny".
• Maier, G. (2003) "African Dinosaurs Unearthed: The Tendaguru Expeditions ". /uk.
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "BAROSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 15th Dec 2017.
  top