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STYRACOSAURUS

a plant-eating centrosaurian ceratopsian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
Pronunciation: sty-RAK-oh-SOR-us
Meaning: Spike lizard
Author/s: Lambe (1913)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 78

Styracosaurus albertensis

Etymology
Styracosaurus is derived from the Greek "styrax" (spike on the end of a spear) and "sauros" (lizard), referring to the huge spikes on its frill.
The species epithet, albertensis, means "from Alberta" in Latin.
Discovery
The holotype of Styracosaurus (CMN 344) is an almost complete skull collected by C.H. Sternberg from Sternberg Quarry 106 (aka RTMP Quarry 16, Happy Jack Ferry) in Dinosaur Park Formation (Belly River Group), Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. The rest of its skeleton was collected in 1935 by Sternberg's son Levi for the University of Toronto and the entire skeleton now resides in the collections of the Canadian Museum of Nature in Gatineau, Quebec. Subsequently, its remains were bolstered with the holotype of Styracosaurus parksi (AMNH 5372) from Middle Fork of Sand Creek in the Dinosaur Park Formation which turned out to be synonymous, and at least one expert believes that Monoclonius nasicornus, whose holotype (AMNH 5351) was found at RTMP Quarry 105, which is also at Sand Creek, represent female Styracosaurus. Most palaeontologists, however, regard the latter as a synonym of Centrosaurus apertus.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 80-73 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 5.5 meters
Est. max. hip height: 1.6 meters
Est. max. weight: 2.2 tons
Diet: Herbivore
References
• L.M. Lambe (1913) "A new genus and species from the Belly River Formation of Alberta". The Ottowa Naturalist, Vol. XXVII, No. 9, Pages 109-116.
• Brown B and Schlaikjer EM (1937) "The skeleton of Styracosaurus with the description of a new species". American Museum novitates; No. 955, 30th October 1937. [coins Styracosaurus parksi.]
• Peter Dodson (1998) "The Horned Dinosaurs: a Natural History".
• M. J. Ryan, R. Holmes and A. P. Russell (2007) "A revision of the Late Campanian Centrosaurine Styracosaurus from the Western interior of North America". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 27(4):944-962.
• P. Dodson, C.A. Forster and S.D. Sampson (2004) "Ceratopsidae" in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmólska (eds.) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
• Michael J. Ryan and David C. Evans (2005) "Ornithischian Dinosaurs" in Dinosaur Provincial Park: A Spectacular Ancient Ecosystem Revealed.
• A.T. McDonald & J.R. Horner (2010) "New Material of "Styracosaurus" ovatus from the Two Medicine Formation of Montana" in New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs: The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "STYRACOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 26th Jul 2017.
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