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CEDRORESTES

a plant-eating styracosternan iguanodont dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of North America.
image
Pronunciation: see-dro-RESS-teez
Meaning: Cedar mountain dweller
Author/s: Gilpin et al. (2007)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Utah, USA
Chart Position: 492

Cedrorestes crichtoni

Cedrorestes was named by David Gilpin in 2007 and immediately drew suspicious glances from certain paleontologists who suspected it was the same critter as Planicoxa which was named six years earlier. Both were found in Utah's Cedar Mountain Formation, both are styracosternans, and both are known from sparse, fragmentary fossils that suggest their owners differ in size. Although normally a bugbear of paleontologists, meagre fossils look to be Cedrorestes' saving grace... along with the fact that its bonebed was separated from Planicoxa's by million of years.

Apart from a single bone, no like-for-like fossils were available for direct comparisson so scientists couldn't sink Cedrorestes into Planicoxa even if they wanted to, but sometimes one bone makes all the difference. Study of their compareable ilia showed that Cedrorestes and Planicoxa were distinct after all, as this hip bone of the former sports features in common with both hadrosaurids and non-hadrosaurid iguanodontian styracosternans, though the authors reckon it's a proper hadrosaurid which would make it the first of its kind known from the early Cretaceous and thus the oldest one currently known.
(Cedar mountain dweller) Etymology
Cedrorestes is derived from the Latin "cedrus" (cedar) and the Greek "oros" (mountain)—for the Cedar Mountain Formation where it was found, and the Greek "-etes" (dweller).
The species epithet, crichtoni, honors Michael Crichton, the author of Jurassic Park.
Discovery
The remains of Cedrorestes were discovered "Dave's Camp Site" near the top of the Yellow Cat Member of Emery County's Cedar Mountain Formation, east-central Utah, USA.
The holotype (DMNH 47994) is a partial skeleton including rib fragments, a sacrum, the left ilium and a portion of the right, a right thighbone, the right third metatarsal, and fragments of tendons that stiffen the tail.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Barremian
Age range: 130-125 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 6 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 800 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Gilpin D, DiCroce T and Carpenter K (2007) "A possible new basal hadrosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah" in Kenneth Carpenter "Horns and Beaks: Ceratopsian and Ornithopod Dinosaurs". Indiana University Press. pp. 79–89.
• Weishampel DB and Horner JR (1990) "Hadrosauridae". Pages 534–561 in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmólska (eds.) "The Dinosauria: First Edition". University of California Press.
• Norman DB (2004) "Basal Iguanodontia". Pages 438–463 in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmólska (eds.) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition". University of California Press.
• Kirkland JI and Madsen SK (2007) "The Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, eastern Utah: the view up and always interesting learning curve". Pages 1–108 in Lund WL (ed.) "Field Guide to Geological Excursions in Southern Utah". Geological Society of America Rocky Mountain Section 2007 Annual Meeting. Grand Junction Geological Society, Utah Geological Association Publication.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "CEDRORESTES :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 27th Apr 2017.
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