dinochecker
Welcome to our CHINSHAKIANGOSAURUS entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 788
fbtwitg+feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

CHINSHAKIANGOSAURUS

a plant-eating sauropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of what is now China.
image
Pronunciation: jin-SHA-kian-go-SOR-us
Meaning: Chinshakiang lizard
Author/s: Ye vide Dong (1992)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Yunnan, China
Chart Position: 296

Chinshakiangosaurus chunghoensis

Although Chinshakiangosaurus is known from a large chunk of skeleton, most of it is locked away in storage and unavailable for study but it still managed to get itself named twice by two different authors before it was even added to the roll call of dinosaurs. Ye named it Chinshakiangosaurus chonghoensis in 1975|1| and Zhou Chinshakiangosaurus zhonghoensis a decade later|2|, but we had to wait a further seven years for an official description of the now-named Chinshakiangosaurus chunghoensis by Dong Zhiming which, although brief, was enough to haul it from the realms of "nomen nudum"|3|.

All we know of Chinshakiangosaurus we know from a partial vertebra, a thighbone and a lower jaw which sports a unique combination of sauropod and non-sauropod sauropodamorph (aka prosauropod) features. Like sauropods proper, its lower jaw is a broad "U-shape" when viewed from above (or below), it has a bony brace around the outer-edge of its teeth that reinforced the base of its crowns, and the teeth themselves have wrinkled enamel. But like most prosauropods its teeth are peppermint-leaf-shaped and its lower jaw sports a ridge that probably anchored cheeks.

Based on the available remains, latest research recovered Chinshakiangosaurus as the most basalmost of the basal sauropods in which case cheeks would be big news. All other sauropods lost them, which allowed a wider gape to gorge on the huge quantities of foliage required to fuel their collosal bodies. The flipside being; without cheeks you can't chew, so they swallowed gastroliths to process plant matter in their gut.
Discovery
The remains of Chinshakiangosaurus were discovered in the Fengjiahe Formation at Zhonghe, Dianzhong Basin, Yunnan, China by Zhao Xijin in 1970. Upchurch et al. stated that they were found in "Yungyin County" but they're actually from Yongren based on geographic coordinates|4|.
The holotype (IVPP V14474) is a mandible (lower jaw).
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Jurassic
Stage: Hettangian-Toarcian
Age range: 199-176 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 12 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 4 tons
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Sauropodomorpha
Sauropoda?
Chinshakiangosaurus
chunghoensis
References
• Ye, C.-H. (or Yeh, C.-H.) (1975) "Jurassic system" in Mesozoic redbeds of Yunnan (ed. Z. Su), pp. 11–30. Beijing: Geological Publishing House (in Chinese).
• Zhao, X.-J. (or Chao, S.) (1985) "The reptiles of Jurassic in China" in The Jurassic System of China (ed. S.-E.Wang), pp. 286–9. Beijing: Geological Publishing House (in Chinese).
• Dong, Zhiming and Chih-ming Tung (1992) "Dinosaurian faunas of China".
• P. Upchurch, P.M. Barrett, Zhao Xijin and Xu Xing (2007) "A re-evaluation of Chinshakiangosaurus chunghoensis Ye vide Dong 1992 (Dinosauria, Sauropodomorpha): implications for cranial evolution in basal sauropod dinosaurs".
• Paul Upchurch, Paul M. Barret, Peter Dodson, (2004) "Sauropoda" in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "CHINSHAKIANGOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 30th Mar 2017.
  top