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UNESCOCERATOPS

a plant-eating leptoceratopsid ceratopsian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
Pronunciation: oo-NESS-co-SEH-ruh-tops
Meaning: Unesco horn face
Author/s: Ryan, Evans, Currie, et al. (2012)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 659

Unescoceratops koppelhusae

Despite being known only from a partial lower jaw, scientists have deduced that Unescoceratops is a member of Ceratopsia; a group of herbivorous dinosaurs that culminated in the ginormous, horn-faced, skull-frilled, Triceratops. But more specifically, it belongs to Leptoceratopsidae; a fairly primitive family of ceratopsians that are modestly-sized and lack brow horns, have little-to-nothing in the way of a nose horn and sport relatively small frills. Unescoceratops was so small, in fact, that fodder any higher than 0.5 meters was out of reach when browsing on all fours. However, rearing up on its hind legs would result in an increase in reach, but only to the point at which its tail—stiffened by interwoven bony struts—touched the floor and blocked hip pivot. Finding a rock or log to stand on would have been amazingly beneficial.

Unescoceratops' teeth are unique in being more rounded than those of other leptoceratopsids which, the authors claim, has implications for the entire evolution of the Leptoceratopsidae. Unfortunately, we don't know what those utterly important implications are because an unscrupulous publisher has locked them up behind a "pay wall" and the price of a glympse is astronomical, with none of the monies being being pumped back into science, we might add.
Etymology
Unescoceratops is derived from "UNESCO" (an acronym of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, who designated Alberta's Dinosaur Provincial Park as a World Heritage Site) and the Greek "ceras" (horn) and "-ops" (face).
The species epithet, koppelhusae, is named to honor Eva B. Koppelhus, in recognition of her contributions to vertebrate paleontology and palynology—"the study of microscopic objects of macromolecular organic composition".
Discovery
The remains of Unescoceratops were discovered in Bonebed 55 of the Dinosaur Park Formation, Steveville region, Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada, by Philip Currie in 1995. They were described in 1998 and referred to as Leptoceratops.
The holotype (TMP 95.12.6) is a partial left dentary (tooth-bearing bone of the lower jaw).
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 80-73 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 1.8 meters
Est. max. hip height: 0.5 meters
Est. max. weight: 100 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Ryan MJ, Evans DC, Currie PJ, Brown CM and Brinkman D (2012) "New leptoceratopsids from the Upper Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada". Cretaceous Research. 35: 69–80. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2011.11.018.
• Mallon JC, Evans DC, Ryan, Anderson MJ and Jason S (2013) "Feeding height stratification among the herbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada". BMC Ecology. 13: 14. doi:10.1186/1472-6785-13-14.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "UNESCOCERATOPS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 26th Jul 2017.
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