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WUERHOSAURUS

a plant-eating stegosaurid thyreophoran dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of China.
wuerhosaurus
Pronunciation: woo-UHR-huh-SOR-us
Meaning: Wuerho lizard
Author/s: Dong (1973)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Xinjiang, China
Chart Position: 186

Wuerhosaurus homheni

(Wuerho lizard with flat and wide hips)Etymology
Wuerhosaurus is derived from "Wuerho" (a town close to its place of discovery) and the Greek "sauros" (lizard). The species epithet, homheni, means "flat and wide" in Latin, in reference to the design of its hips.
Discovery
The fist fossils of Wuerhosaurus were recovered from the Lianmugin Formation (Tugulu Group) near the town of Wuerho, Xinjiang, China.
The holotype (IVPP V.4006) is a skull-less fragmentary skeleton. Some tail bones (IVPP V4007) from a second individual were also discovered in the same bonebed.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Berriasian-Valanginian
Age range: 145-136 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 7 meters
Est. max. hip height: 2 meters
Est. max. weight: 3.5 tons
Diet: Herbivore
wuerhosaurus-size.png
Other species
Wuerhosaurus ordosensis (IVPP V6877—a fragmentary skeleton lacking the skull, and referred specimens IVPP V6878 and 6879 from the same locality) was discovered in the Ejinhoro Formation, Ordos Basin of Inner Mongolia, in 1988. A couple of meters shorter than Wuerhosaurus homheni, perhaps two tons lighter and with a shorter neck, Wuerhosaurus ordosensis was named in 1993 by Zhiming Dong. Maidment et al. renamed it Stegosaurus homheni in 2008, but most paleontologists still cast suspicious glances at it.
Wuerhosaurus mongoliensis (PIN Coll.—back and tail vertebrae and a lump of pelvic girdle from the Khukhtyk Formation) was coined by freelancer Roman Ulansky in 2014. Apparently, its hip is more massive and the spines on its vertebra are thicker and higher than other species of Wuerhosaurus, and it sports a relatively large spinal canal. But because of Ulansky's habit of naming dinosaurs willy-nilly based on material that other paleontologists have already dismissed as tat, plus the fact that his papers are only ever released in Russian, this critter may never be taken seriously by experts.
References
• Dong Z. (1973) "Dinosaurs from Wuerho. Reports of Paleontological Expedition to Sinkiang (II): Pterosaurian Fauna from Wuerho, Sinkiang". Memoirs of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology.
• Dong Z. (1990) "Stegosaurs of Asia" in K. Carpenter and P. J. Currie (Eds.) "Dinosaur Systematics: Approaches and Perspectives". (pp. 255-268).
• Dong Z. (1994) "A new species of stegosaur (Dinosauria) from the Ordos Basin, Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China".
• Paul G.S. (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs".
• Maidment S.C.R, Norman D.B, Barrett P.M, Upchurch P. (2008) "Systematics and phylogeny of Stegosauria (Dinosauria: Ornithischia)". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 6(4):367–407.
• Ulansky, R. E. (2014) "Evolution of the stegosaurs (Dinosauria; Ornithischia)". Dinologia, 35 pp.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "WUERHOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 30th Mar 2017.
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