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Categories: CeratopsiaHerbivoreArgentinaLate Cretaceous

NOTOCERATOPS

Pronunciation: not-o-SER-a-tops
Meaning: Southern horned face
Named by: Tapia (1918)
Previous names: None known
First discovery: Chubut, Argentina
Roar factor: ?/10

Notoceratops bonarellii

In 1918 Augusto Tapia referred to Notoceratops as a ceratopsian and was nearly laughed out of science. If you want your discovery to be considered a bona-fide ceratopsian—or horn-faced dinosaur—you need to have proof in the form of a fossilized horned face, or a horn that may have been attached to a face, or at least a face, and Notoceratops is known only from a dentiary—the tooth bearing bone of the lower jaw... and in this case it was lacking the teeth!

Also hindering his case was the previous lack of ceratopsian remains from the entire Southern Hemisphere never mind South America, and even when Serendipaceratops bolstered the number of potential ceratopsians from this side of the globe to a whopping two the Notoceratops ceratopsian cause was not helped by the fact that its only known remains were long lost by this point.

First described by Friedrich von Huene in 1929, it's just as likey that Notoceratops is a duck-billed hadrosaur—not exactly common in these parts themselves, though a damned sight more so than neoceratopsians—but with no remains to re-evaluate we will never really know.
(Bonarelli's southern horn face) Etymology
Notoceratops is derived from the Greek "notos" (the South), "ceras" (horn) and "ops" (face) for its discovery in the Southern Hemisphere and presumed position as a ceratopsian (horn-faced) dinosaur.
The species epithet, bonarellii (BON-uh-RELL-eye) honours Guido Bonarelli who advised Tapia in his study of the find. It is often mispelled with just the one "i".
Discovery
The only confirmed remains of Notoceratops were was discovered near the Lago Colhué Huapí in Chubut, Argentina, by Augusto Tapia in 1918.
The holotype - a toothless lower jaw bone (dentiary) - is lost.
References
• A. Tapia (1918) "Una mandibula de dinosaurio procedente de Patagonia".
• F. von Huene (1929) Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196
• Peter Dodson (1998) "The Horned Dinosaurs: a Natural History". /uk.
Estimations
Timeline: Vital Stats:
Era: Mesozoic Est. Max. Length: ?
Period: Late Cretaceous Est. Max. Height: ?
Timespan: 71-68.5 million years ago Est. Max. Weight: ?
Age: Maastrichtian Diet: Herbivorous
             
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