dinochecker
Welcome to our JURAVENATOR entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 797
fbtwitg+feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

JURAVENATOR

a meat-eating basal coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of Germany.
juravenator.png
Pronunciation: joo-RAH-veh-NAY-tuhr
Meaning: Jura hunter
Author/s: Gohlich and Chiappe (2006)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Eichstatt, Germany
Chart Position: 470

Juravenator starki

Juravenator is known from a beautifully preserved, almost complete little skeleton found in the same fine-grained limestone as Compsognathus and Archaeopteryx, and was referred to Compsognathidae via some oft-thought questionable techniques. Apparently, Luis Chiappe not-so-much pruned the theropod family tree as decimated it during cladistic analysis which, for all intents and purposes, pounded Juravenator into a group to which it seemingly didn't belong. Understandably miffed paleontologists have run a half-dozen analyses of their own since then, and Juravenator is not quite what it used to be. Not quite.

Flying in the face of Sinosauropteryx and other compsognathids who are proven to be at least partially feathered, exceptionally preserved patches of skin from the tail base and hind legs of Juravenator clearly sport scales. Unfortunately, before an official paper was released, Juravenator was nick-named "Borsti" which is typically reserved for bristle-haired dogs, and this enraged anti-evolutionists who won't entertain the notion that birds are dinosaurs and the universe could conceivably be older than a few thousand years.

Faced with God-botherers' with their relentless tub-thumping, paleontologists were compelled to study Juravenator more closely and discovered a couple of interesting facts; under UV light its upper tail and hips look to be surrounded with faint impressions of filamentous structures aka "proto" feathers, and Juravenator isn't a compsognathid at all, it's a primitive coelurosaur, closely related to compsognathids.

Currently, the only known specimen of Juravenator is considered a juvenile because of "sutures"—expansion joints in young bones that fuse together upon adulthood—so it's anyone's guess what size maturity would bring.
Etymology
Two possible meanings of Juravenator are often listed: One honors the small Jura mountain range, just north of the Alps, and the other is simply a shortening of "Jurassic". In actual fact, the Jura mountain range, on the border of France and Switzerland, gave rise to the term Jurassic, being the first area to reveal strata dating from roughly 199 to 145 million years old—the Jurassic as it is now known. "Venator" is a Latin term meaning "hunter".
The specific epithet, starki, honours the Stark family, owners of Stark Quarry where the Jurassic Hunter was discovered.
Discovery
Stark Quarry lies within the Painten Formation of Eichstatt, Germany, and the Juravenator holotype that was discovered there (JME Sch 200) is a 60cm long, almost complete and articulated skeleton missing the last third of its tail. It was discovered in 1998 by amateur paleontologist Klaus-Dieter Weiß.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Jurassic
Stage: Kimmeridgian
Age range: 156-151 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 0.8 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 1.5 Kg
Diet: Carnivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Theropoda
Tetanurae
Coelurosauria
Juravenator
starki
References
• U.B. Göhlich and L.M. Chiappe (2006) "A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen archipelago".
• R.J. Butler and P. Upchurch (2007) "Highly incomplete taxa and the phylogenetic relationships of the theropod dinosaur Juravenator starki".
• G.S. Paul (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs". p.118.
• John Long, Peter Schouten (2009) "Feathered Dinosaurs: The Origin of Birds".
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "JURAVENATOR :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 27th Apr 2017.
  top