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DIABLOCERATOPS

a plant-eating centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of North America.
diabloceratops.png
Pronunciation: dee-AB-lo-SEH-ruh-tops
Meaning: Devil's horned face
Author/s: Kirkland and DeBlieux (2010)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Utah, USA
Chart Position: 578

Diabloceratops eatoni

The first remnant of what would become Diabloceratops was tagged "the Nipple Butte skull"—discovered by Josh Smith in 1998 jutting out of the lower sandstone member on the south end of the Kaiparowits Plateau. Despite the significance of the find there was a water-tight "no off road driving" law in place and, being discovered off-road, its removal involved sledging it to the nearest road on the up-turned roof of a Ford Mustang! Another skull was discovered near Last Chance Creek in the middle of the middle mudstone member of the Wahweap in 2002 but its extraction was lacking the raw passion of the original and involved gas-powered cutoff saws and helicopters, but at least it was diognostic and that's what counts.

The "Last Chance skull" represents the first diagnostic later than Late Campanian centrosaurine ever recovered south of Montana, and is a good meter long from beak to the back of its frill, where a pair of spectacular curved spines add half a meter to its total height. Despite its relatively slim, somewhat tapered and outrageously flambuoyant frill, the skull that it is attached to is deeper and shorter than any hitherto known centrosaurine, and the whole thing looks like somekind of primitive field-ploughing contraption when viewed from the front.
Etymology
Suggested by Scott Hartman, Diabloceratops is derived from the Spanish "Diablo" (devil), in reference to the "devilish horns" on the top of its frill, and the Greek "ceras" (horn) and "ops" (face). The species epithet, eatoni (ee-TON-eye), both honors Jeffery G. Eaton—paleontologist at Weber State University and long time friend of lead author Jim Kirkland—for his role in establishing Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument where the specimen was found, and gives him a playful dig in the ribs for favouring the study of extinct mammals over dinosaurs!
Discovery
Diabloceratops was discovered at the Wahweap Formation of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, southern Utah by Don DeBlieux in 2002.
The holotype (UMNH VP 16699) is the "Last Chance skull" - all of the right side and part of the left, housed at the Utah University Museum of Natural History.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 84-76 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 5.5 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 2 tons
Diet: Herbivore
References
• J.I. Kirkland and D.D. DeBlieux (2010) "New basal centrosaurine skulls from the Wahweap Formation Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Utah" in New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs: The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "DIABLOCERATOPS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 18th Dec 2017.
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