dinochecker
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DEINONYCHUS

a meat-eating dromaeosaurid theropod dinosaur from the Early cretaceous of North America.
deinonychus
Pronunciation: die-NON-ee-kuss
Meaning: Terrible claws
Author/s: Ostrom (1969)
Synonyms: Velociraptor antirrhopus
First Discovery: Montana, USA
Chart Position: 173

Deinonychus antirrhopus

Back in the day, Thomas Huxley announced his theory that birds had evolved from fearfully-great-lizards and was almost laughed out of science, and the opinion that dinosaurs were not-very-bright sluggish layabouts persisted right into the 1960's. John Ostrom's study of Deinonychus—with its small body, sleek, horizontal posture, ratite-like spine, and enlarged raptorial claws on the feet, all suggestive of an active, agile predator—revolutionized the way scientists thought about dinosaurs and led to the "dinosaur renaissance". Truth be told, though, if Barnum Brown hadn't become so totally bored of pulling T.rex skeletons out of baron badlands we probably wouldn't be thinking about dinosaurs as we now do.
Discovery
The first fossils we now know belong to Deinonychus—a partial skeleton (AMNH 3015, informally named "Daptosaurus agilis") and some large teeth wrongly associated with a smaller, partial skeleton (AMNH 3041, informally named "Megadontosaurus ferox")—were discovered near Billings, Wheatland County, Montana, in 1933 by Barnum Brown. The Deinonychus holotype (YPM 5205) is a complete left foot and partial right foot found at Edwards Ranch in the Cloverly Formation of Carbon County, Montana, by an expedition from Yale's Peabody Museum in 1964. Brown's "Megadontosaurus", minus the teeth, was renamed Microvenator by John Ostrom in 1970.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Aptian-Albian
Age range: 118-110 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 4 meters
Est. max. hip height: 1 meters
Est. max. weight: 75 Kg
Diet: Carnivore
Synonyms
Velociraptor antirrhopus (Ostrom, 1969)
References
• Ostrom, J. H. (1969) "Osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus, an unusual theropod from the Lower Cretaceous of Montana". Peabody Museum of Natural History, Bulletin 30.
• Mark Norell, Eugène S. Gaffney, Lowell Dingus (2000) "Discovering Dinosaurs: Evolution, Extinction, and the Lessons of Prehistory, Expanded and Updated". /uk.
• Brian T. Roach and Daniel L. Brinkman (2007) "A Reevaluation of Cooperative Pack Hunting and Gregariousness in Deinonychus antirrhopus and Other Nonavian Theropod Dinosaurs".
• Parsons, W. L. and Parsons, K. M. (2009) "Further descriptions of the osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Saurischia, Theropoda)".
• Denver W. Fowler, Elizabeth A. Freedman, John B. Scannella, Robert E. Kambic (2011) "The Predatory Ecology of Deinonychus and the Origin of Flapping in Birds".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "DEINONYCHUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 16th Dec 2017.
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