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LEPTOCERATOPS

a small leptoceratopsid cerapod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
leptoceratops-skel.png
Pronunciation: LEP-to-SEH-ruh-tops
Meaning: Small horn-face
Author/s: Barnum Brown (1914)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 86

Leptoceratops gracilis

Although Leptoceratops is related to the horn-faced colossus that is Triceratops, and may have shared its time and place, it was tiny by comparison. However, size is no guarantee of strength. It's no guarantee of having an entire group of dinosaurs named in your honor either, and despite being less than two meters long and only about the weight of a wolf Leptoceratops anchors Leptoceratopsidae; a family of small, possibly bipedal, "horn faced" (ceratopsian) herbivores who are suprisingly lacking in the face horn department, but are united by the presence of incredibly deep, robust jaws and huge, bulbous teeth.
(Slender, Small Horn Face)Etymology
Leptoceratops is derived from the Greek "leptos" (small), "ceras" (horn) and "ops" (face). The species epithet, gracilis, means "slender" in Latin.
Discovery
The first remains of Leptoceratops (holotype: AMNH 5205 - a partial skeleton) were discovered in the Scollard Formation, 3 miles above Tolman Ferry, Red Deer Valley, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, by Barnum Brown in 1910. More, and more complete, specimens were discovered in the same area by C.M. Sternberg in 1947. Remains were also found in the Bighorn Basin, northern Wyoming, in 1978.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Maastrichtian
Age range: 71-66 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 1.8 meters
Est. max. hip height: 0.6 meters
Est. max. weight: 45 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
Second Species?
Based on meagre fossils collected in the St. Mary River Formation of Buffalo Lake, Montana, around 1916 by Barnum Brown and Erich M. Schlaikjer, the former named a second species of Leptoceratops: Leptoceratops cerorhynchos, in 1935. However, later disccoveries showed that this material belonged to a hitherto unknown species that Sternberg named Montanoceratops in 1951.
References
• Brown, B. (1914) "Leptoceratops, a new genus of Ceratopsia from the Edmonton Cretaceous of Alberta".
• P. Senter (2007) "Analysis of forelimb function in basal ceratopsians."
• Peter Dodson (1998) "The Horned Dinosaurs: A Natural History." /uk.
• Ott, C. J. (2006) "Cranial anatomy and biogeography of the first Leptoceratops gracilis (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) specimens from the Hell Creek Formation, southeast Montana" in K. Carpenter (ed.) "Horns and Beaks: Ceratopsian and Ornithopod Dinosaurs". /uk.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "LEPTOCERATOPS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 24th Nov 2017.
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