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PANTYDRACO

a plant-eating sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Late Triassic of Wales.
pantydraco
Pronunciation: PANT-uh-DRAY-co
Meaning: Pant-y-ffynnon dragon
Author/s: Galton et al. (2007)
Synonyms: Thecodontosaurus caducus
First Discovery: Pant-y-Ffynon, Wales
Chart Position: 511

Pantydraco caducus

Pantydraco began its life after death as a juvenile specimen of Thecodontosaurus antiquus after being discovered in South Wales by Kenneth A. Kermack and Pamela L. Robinson way back in 1952. It was tagged in the thesis of Warrener in 1983 and described officially albeit briefly by Kermack in 1984. Then it became Thecodontosaurus caducus when Adam Yates scrutinized its remains further in 2003.

Problem is, although discovered only a stones throw away from the original Thecodontosaurus specimens, some of the bones referred to Thecodontosaurus caducus bear no resemblance to the corresponding bones of the original Thecodontosaurus. Primitive features of its neck, upper arm and hip forced Yates and chums into a flip-flop, and after much pondering they used these remains to anchor an all new genus — Pantydraco — in 2007. Go on, have a little giggle. You know you want to.
(Fallen Panty-y-ffynnon Dragon)Etymology
Pantydraco takes its name from the "panty" of Panty-y-ffynnon quarry (see below) and "draco" (a dragon or mythical dragon-like creature in Latin). To pronounce the "Y" of Pantydraco in proper Welsh you need to be sounding like a caveman. "Uh" is the correct vernacular, we believe.
The species epithet, caducus, means "fallen" in Latin, referring to the assumption that it fell into a fissure fill (quarry) and died there.
Discovery
The fossils of Pantydraco were discovered at the old Pant-y-ffnynnon (Valley of the Spring) Quarry, Bonvilston (3 miles east of Cowbridge), South Glamorgan, South Wales, by Kermack and Robinson in 1952.
The holotype (BMNH P 24) consists of a nearly complete but disjointed skull, a complete set of neck verts, a shoulder girdle and a humerus. Barring what may be a bit of right hip (ischium), it's basically a mystery from the armpits down.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Triassic
Stage: Rhaetian
Age range: 209-201 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 2 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 16 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Sauropodomorpha
Pantydraco
caducus
References
• Warrener, D. (1983) "An Archisaurian Fauna from a Welsh Locality". (Unpublished Ph. D. thesis in Zoology, University of London, London: 384 p).
• Adam M. Yates (2003). "A new species of the primitive dinosaur Thecodontosaurus (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha) and its implications for the systematics of early dinosaurs".
• P.M. Galton and P. Upchurch (2004) "Prosauropoda" in "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
• P.M. Galton, A.M. Yates and D. Kermack (2007) "Pantydraco n. gen. for Thecodontosaurus caducus YATES, 2003 - a basal sauropodomorph from the Late Triassic or Early Jurassic of South Wales, UK".
• P.M. Galton and D. Kermack (2010) "The anatomy of Pantydraco caducus, a very basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Rhaetian of South Wales, UK".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "PANTYDRACO :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 22nd Oct 2017.
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