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KHETRANISAURUS

a plant-eating titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Pakistan.
Pronunciation: khet-RAHN-i-SOR-us
Meaning: Khetran lizard
Author/s: Malkani (2006)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Balochistan, Pakistan
Chart Position: 482

Khetranisaurus barkhani

Pakistani dinosaurs were a bit thin on the ground until 2006; then, after announcing the discovery of some 3,000 fossils, Muhammad Sadiq Malkani managed to name five all at the same time. Under normal circumstances, expanding the roll call of dinosaurs with Khetranisaurus, Balochisaurus, Marisaurus, Pakisaurus and Sulmainisaurus would be glorious news. But Malkani has a gift for provoking frustration, confusion, anger, and sadness, all wrapped up in a single article. And he's prolific.

Although initially spelled Khateranisaurus in a 2004 paper that as far as we know is still "in press" (meaning unpublished), the official description of Khetranisaurus arrived in 2006. Like the other four critters mentioned above, it's based on the strength of tail vertebrae. But in this case it's just a single tail vertebra. And even that one is fragmentary!

True to form, Malkani assigned more neck vertebrae to it from the Vitakri Member of the PAB Formation in 2009, but by this point he was calling it the Vitakri Formation. And he is still adamant that Khetranisaurus (along with Sulaimanisaurus and Pakisaurus) belongs to Pakisauridae — a raised-for-the-occasion Pakistan-exclusive replacement name for a family of titanosaurian sauropods that everyone else knows as Titanosauridae.

In the world of Malkani, tail bones and seemingly unnecessary dinosaur names and uncalled-for families in which to house them are King. And to highlight this, both Marisaurus and Balochisaurus — unsurprisingly named for tail bones — belong to Balochisauridae, which regular folks know as Saltasauridae.
(Khetran lizard of Barkhan) Etymology
Khetranisaurus is derived from "Khetran" (for the Khetran tribe of Barkhan district, Pakistan) and the Greek "sauros" (lizard).
The species epithet (or specific name), barkhani, is named for Barkhan District.
Discovery
The remains of Khetranisaurus were discovered at the Kinwa Kali Kakor locality (DL-4) in the Vitakri member of the PAB formation, Barkhan District, Balochistan Province, Pakistan, by a team of palaeontologists from the Geological Survey of Pakistan (GSP) in 2001. The holotype (MSM-27-4) is a single fragmentary caudal (tail) vertebra. Another partial tail vertebra (MSM-28-4) was assigned to Khetranisaurus by Malkani in 2006, followed by MSM-520-2, MSM-525-9 and MSM-833-15 (more tail vertebrae) in 2009.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Maastrichtian
Age range: 71-66 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: ?
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: ?
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Sauropodomorpha
Sauropoda
Macronaria
Titanosauria
Pakisauridae?
Khetranisaurus
barkhani
References
• Malkani MS (2004) "Saurischian dinosaurs from Late Cretaceous of Pakistan". In Hussain SS & Akbar AD (eds.) "5th Pakistan Geological Congress, Islamabad".
• Malkani MS (2006) "Biodiversity of Saurischian Dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous Park of Pakistan". Journal of Applied and Emerging Sciences, 1 (3) 108-140.
• Malkani MS (2009) "New Balochisaurus (Balochisauridae, Titanosauria, Sauropoda) and Vitakridrinda (Theropoda) remains from Pakistan". Sindh Univ. Res. Jour. (Sci. Ser.) Vol. 41 (2) 65-92.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "KHETRANISAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 20th Oct 2017.
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