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ATROCIRAPTOR

a small maniraptoran theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of North America.
image
Pronunciation: ah-TROSS-ih-RAP-tor
Meaning: Savage Plunderer
Author/s: Currie and Varricchio (2004)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 439

Atrociraptor marshalli

Known only from a skull comprising parts of the upper and lower jaws and teeth dragged from Alberta's Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Atrociraptor—although just a couple of meters long and 15 kg in weight—was probably every bit as savage as the name implies.

Its upper jaw is unique in having one fenestra ("window") directly above another rather than well behind it as in all other dromaeosaurids, and a proportionately shorter and deeper snout than its saurornitholestine relatives which suggests greater bite power. Its teeth—almost all the same size and all generously serrated—were only modestly curved but emerged from their sockets at a backwards-pointing angle, which is a perfect design for snagging live prey and tearing flesh from its bones.
Etymology
Atrociraptor is derived from the Latin "atrox" (savage) and "raptor" (plunderer or thief).
The species epithet, marshalli, honors Wayne Marshall of East Coulee, Alberta, Canada, who discovered the type specimen.
Discovery
The first fossils of Atrociraptor were discovered about 5 meters above the Daly Coal seam in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Drumheller, Alberta, Canada, about 5 km west of the Royal Tyrell Museum where they are now housed, by Wayne Marshall in 1995. The holotype (TMP 95.166.1) is a partial skull.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian-Maastrichtian
Age range: 73-67 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 2 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 15 Kg
Diet: Carnivore
References
• Currie P.J. and Varicchio D.J. (2004) "A new dromaeosaurid from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Alberta, Canada" in "Feathered Dragons".
• Paul G.S. (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs". Page 136.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "ATROCIRAPTOR :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 20th Jan 2018.
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