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NEOVENATOR

a meat-eating neovenatorid theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of England.
neovenator
Pronunciation: NEE-o-veh-NAY-tuhr
Meaning: New hunter
Author/s: Hutt et al. (1996)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Isle of Wight, UK
Chart Position: 337

Neovenator salerii

When the first remains of Neovenator salerii were chiseled out of a storm-caused cliff landslide on the Isle of Wight in 1978 they were pencilled-in as the remnants of a Megalosaurus relative, and why wouldn't they be? They were big, English and belonged to a carnivorous dinosaur, and this is where most big, English, carnivorous dinosaurs tend to end up. However, after 18 years of MacGuyver-like missions and with 70% of its skeleton now known thanks to contributions from three seperate individuals, Neovenator is pretty well understood. Well, more so than it used to be.

Neovenator was officially named during its first scientific description in 1996 by Steve Hutt who identified it as an allosaurid, then Darren Naish noted some similarities to the shark-toothed charcarodontosaurids. As it turns out, Neovenator (meaning "new hunter") was exactly that, an all new species of carnivorous dinosaur which has since gone on to anchor its own family of previously problematic cosmopolitan carnivores — a bunch of moderately-sized, sleek and fleet of foot theropods known as neovenatorids — that are related to both the allosaurids and carcharodontosaurids, though they're closer to the latter than to the former.
Etymology
Neovenator is derived from the Greek "neos" (new) and the Latin "venator" (hunter) - a reference to its status as a previously unknown species of carnivorous dinosaur. The species epithet, salerii, honors the Salero family - owners of the land on which Neovenator was discovered.
Discovery
The first fossils of Neovenator were discovered in the Wessex Formation (Wealden Group) at Brighstone Bay on the of the Isle of Wight, UK, by the Henwood Family (on holiday from Basingstoke) in 1978.
The holotype (MIWG 6348, housed at the Museum of Isle of Wight Geology) is a partial skeleton.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Barremian
Age range: 130-125 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 7.5 meters
Est. max. hip height: 2.1 meters
Est. max. weight: 850 Kg
Diet: Carnivore
References
• S.L. Brusatte, R.B.J. Benson and S. Hutt (2008) "The osteology of Neovenator salerii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Wealden Group (Barremian) of the Isle of Wight".
• R. B. J. Benson, M. T. Carrano, S. L. Brusatte (2010) "A new clade of archaic large-bodied predatory dinosaurs that survived to the latest Mesozoic".
• D.B. Weishampel, P. Dodson, H. Osmólska (2004) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "NEOVENATOR :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 18th Dec 2017.
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