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ALBERTOSAURUS

a carnivorous albertosaurine tyrannosaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
albertosaurus
Pronunciation: al-BUHR-to-SOR-us
Meaning: Alberta Lizard
Author/s: Osborn (1905)
Synonyms: See below
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 66

Albertosaurus sarcophagus

(Corpse-Eating Alberta Lizard)Etymology
Albertosaurus is derived from "Alberta" (its place of discovery; named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta [1848-1939], the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert) and the Greek "sauros" (lizard). The species epithet, sarcophagus, is derived from the Greek "sarx (flesh) and "phagein" (to eat). Particularly popular with Egyptians and Romans, a sarcophagus is a stone coffin or funeral container which, when filled with lime, would "eat" the flesh from the (normally Royal) corpse within.
Discovery
The first fossils of Albertosaurus were discovered in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation alongside the Red Deer River near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada by renowned geologist Joseph B. Tyrrell in 1884. The holotype (CMN 5600) is a partial skull that E.D. Cope originally assigned to Laelaps incrassatus in 1892. Bizarrely, Laelaps had been officially renamed Dryptosaurus by O.C. Marsh 15 years earlier but Cope refused to follow the work of his "bone wars" nemesis. Lawrence Lambe officially changed Laelaps incrassatus to Dryptosaurus incrassatus in 1904, and a year later H.F. Osborne coined Albertosaurus sarcophagus for CMN 5600 in the same AMNH bulletin that he described Tyrannosaurus rex.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian-Maastrichtian
Age range: 73-67 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 8.6 meters
Est. max. hip height: 3 meters
Est. max. weight: 2.4 tons
Diet: Carnivore
Other species?
Albertosaurus megagracilis was named by Greg Paul in 1988 for a small tyrannosaurid skeleton from Montana's Hell Creek Formation. It was renamed Dinotyrannus megagracilis by George Olshevsky in 1995 but it most probably represents a juvenile specimen of Tyrannosaurus rex.
Albertosaurus arctunguis is based on a partial skeleton (ROM 807) discovered in the Edmonton Formation near the Red Deer River by Gus Lindblad and Ralph Hornell in 1928. In 1970 Dale Russell showed it to be indistinguishable from Albertosaurus sarcophagus.
Albertosaurus libratus was originally named Gorgosaurus libratus by Lawrence Lambe in 1914, based on a partial skeleton discovered in the Dinosaur Park Formation by Charles H. Sternberg in 1913. Dale Russell declared Gorgosaurus a junior synonym of Albertosaurus in 1970, though most paleontologists follow Philip J. Currie's 2003 work and keep the two apart as they are no more similar than Daspletosaurus is to Tyrannosaurus.
Synonyms
Deinodon sarcophagus (Osborn, 1905)
Albertosaurus arctunguis (Parks, 1928)
Deinodon arctunguis (Parks, 1928)
References
• Henry F. Osborn (1905) "Tyrannosaurus and other Cretaceous carnivorous dinosaurs".
• Dale A. Russell (1970) "Tyrannosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of western Canada".
• Thomas R. Holtz, Jr. (2004) "Tyrannosauroidea" in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmólska (eds.) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
• P.J. Currie (1998) "Possible evidence of gregarious behavior in tyrannosaurids".
• William A. Parks (1928) "Albertosaurus arctunguis, a new species of therapodous dinosaur from the Edmonton Formation of Alberta".
• Philip J. Currie (2003) "Allometric growth in tyrannosaurids (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of North America and Asia".
• Darren H. Tanke and Kenneth Carpenter (2001) "Mesozoic Vertebrate Life".
• Bell PR and Currie PJ (2014) "Albertosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) material from an Edmontosaurus bonebed (Horseshoe Canyon Formation) near Edmonton: Clarification of palaeogeographic distribution". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 51(11): 1-6.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "ALBERTOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 21st Aug 2017.
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