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Breadcrumbs .. Early Cretaceous .. Australia .. Wonthaggi .. Herbivore .. Ceratopsia ..

SERENDIPACERATOPS

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Pronunciation: seh-ren-DIP-uh-SEH-ruh-tops
Meaning: Serendip horned face
Author/s: Vickers-Rich (2003)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Victoria, Australia
Chart Position: 407
Pronunciation: seh-ren-dip-uh-ser-a-tops
Meaning: Serendip horned face
Author: Vickers-Rich (2003)
Synomyms: None known
First discovery: Victoria, Australia
Roar factor: ?/10

Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei

Upon discovery, Tom Rich and Patricia Vickers-Rich convinced themselves that the remains of Serendipaceratops belonged to a theropod. During a trip to the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology and a glance at the corresponding remains of Leptoceratops they noted a striking similarity between the two and if their new theory could be substantiated not only would it push the origin of neoceratopsians back almost 30 million years but also shift it to the other side of the planet! A serendipitous find indeed.

However, a single forearm bone isn't the most reliable yardstick when trying to link your new find to something that obviously has a horned face, albeit a modest one, and when Agnolin and colleagues inspected said bone they couldn't find any features to unite it with neoceratopsia nor many to seperate it from an Australian ankylosaur called Minmi.

For over a decade, all that could be said about Serendipaceratops with any certainty is that it was a "genasaurian" — a name used almost exclusively by Paul Sereno for the ornithischian group that includes Neornithischia (marginocephalians, ceratopsians, pachycephalosaurs, cerapods and ornithopods) and Thyreophora (stegosaurs and ankylosaurs) — but in 2014 it was confirmed as an early ceratopsid... by the authors (plus a few learned associates) who thought it was there or thereabouts after a visit to the Royal Tyrrell in paragraph one.
Etymology
Aside from ceratops which is derived from the Greek "ceras" (horn) and "ops" (face) even this critters name is muddled. Some say that it's named for Serendipity - "to find something by accident whilst looking for something entirely different" and others believe it refers to "Serendip" - the legendary name for Sri Lanka. The latter has nothing to do with its place of discovery but is, perhaps coincidently, the birth place of author Arthur C. Clarke who is honored in the species epithet arthurcclarkei.
Discovery
The only known remains of Serendipaceratops were discovered in the Wonthaggi Formation of the Strzelecki Group, in "The Arch" on the shore platform near the village of Kilcunda, Victoria, Australia, by Tom Rich and Patricia Vickers-Rich in the early 1990s. The holotype (NMV P186385) is a partial left ulna (lower arm bone).
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Period: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Aptian-Albian
Age: 118-110 million years ago
Vital Stats:
Est. Max. Length: ?
Est. Max. Height: ?
Est. Max. Weight: ?
Diet: Herbivorous
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Ornithischia
Genasauria
Cerapoda?
Marginocephalia?
Ceratopsia?
Neoceratopsia?
Serendipaceratops
arthurcclarkei
References
• Rich T and Vickers-Rich P (2000) "Dinosaurs of Darkness". /uk.
• Agnolin F.L, Ezcurra M.D, Pais D.F. and Salisbury S.W. (2010) "A reappraisal of the Cretaceous non-avian dinosaur faunas from Australia and New Zealand: Evidence for their Gondwanan affinities".
• Sereno P.C. (1986) "Phylogeny of the bird-hipped dinosaurs (order Ornithischia)".
• Ryan M.J, Chinnery-Allgeier B.J. and Eberth D.A. (2010) "New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs: The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium". /uk.
• Rich T.H, Kear B.P, Sinclair R, Chinnery B, Carpenter K, McHugh M.L. and Vickers-Rich P. (2014) "Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei Rich & Vickers-Rich, 2003 is an Australian Early Cretaceous ceratopsian".
Etymology
Aside from ceratops which is derived from the Greek "ceras" (horn) and "ops" (face) even this critters name is muddled. Some say that it's named for Serendipity - "to find something by accident whilst looking for something entirely different" and others believe it refers to "Serendip" - the legendary name for Sri Lanka. The latter has nothing to do with its place of discovery but is, perhaps coincidently, the birth place of author Arthur C. Clarke who is honored in the species epithet arthurcclarkei.
Discovery
The only known remains of Serendipaceratops were discovered in the Wonthaggi Formation of the Strzelecki Group, in "The Arch" on the shore platform near the village of Kilcunda, Victoria, Australia, by Tom Rich and Patricia Vickers-Rich in the early 1990s. The holotype (NMV P186385) is a partial left ulna (lower arm bone).
Defining features
Coming soon...
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Aptian-Albian
Age range: 118-110 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: ?
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: ?
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Ornithischia
Genasauria
Cerapoda?
Marginocephalia?
Ceratopsia?
Neoceratopsia?
Serendipaceratops
arthurcclarkei
References
• Rich T and Vickers-Rich P (2000) "Dinosaurs of Darkness". /uk.
• Agnolin F.L, Ezcurra M.D, Pais D.F. and Salisbury S.W. (2010) "A reappraisal of the Cretaceous non-avian dinosaur faunas from Australia and New Zealand: Evidence for their Gondwanan affinities".
• Sereno P.C. (1986) "Phylogeny of the bird-hipped dinosaurs (order Ornithischia)".
• Ryan M.J, Chinnery-Allgeier B.J. and Eberth D.A. (2010) "New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs: The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium".
• Rich T.H, Kear B.P, Sinclair R, Chinnery B, Carpenter K, McHugh M.L. and Vickers-Rich P. (2014) "Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei Rich & Vickers-Rich, 2003 is an Australian Early Cretaceous ceratopsian".
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›. Web access: 04th May 2016.
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